Production 137 The Boyfriend

The BoyfriendBy Sandy Wilson

Performed on Wed 15th to Sat 18th July 1992 at The Kilshawe Theatre

 

 

 

 

The Cast

The Cast

Hortense (a French maid) Stephanie Walmsley
Masie Debbie Johnson
Dulcie Justine Sewell
Fay Emily Straight
Nancy Leigh Robe
Polly Browne Sue Watson
Marcel Ben Munroe
Pierre Danny Yates
Alphonse Barrie Lewis-Oswald
Mme. Dubonnet Gill Watson
Bobby van Husan Andrew Slade
Percival Browne Gerry Cavell
Tony Chris Tester
Lord Brockhurst Barrie Reynolds
Lady Brockhurst Phyllis Gray
Gendarme/Waiter Nathan Sewell
Les Enfants Marie Lee & Laura Thomsett
Guests at the Ball Melanie Thorne & Jonathan Slade

Cast of The BoyfriendCast of The Boyfriend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

View the Gallery

View the Gallery

 

Previews/Reviews

Previews/Reviews

The Boyfriend

Time for Nostalgia

Those of a nostalgic frame of mind can do no better than see The Boy Friend, presented by The Guild Players at The Kilshawe Theatre for four performances from Wednesday, July 16th. In The Guild Players production, Sue Watson, who was such a hit in The Guild’s production of My Fair Lady last year, plays Polly Browne. Christopher Sewell will direct and Colin Hartley is the musical director. Debbie Johnson is the choreographer.

Debbie Designs Dances

When The Guild Players recreate the tuneful twenties with the production of The Boy Friend, Debbie Johnson will create all the dances of that period. She is the choreographer for what promises to be a delightful and nostalgic show. Debbie will be remembered for her characterisation of Mavis in The Players production of Stepping Out, in which she scored a direct hit. She was also the choreographer and succeeded in teaching the entire cast to dance – and none of them knew a step to start with. What is more, she had to train them to dance badly for the opening of the show, no easy task.

Cast of The Boyfriend

Vivacious Players in Show Hit

The sheer vivacity of The Guild Players production of The Boy Friend spilled off the stage to captivate four capacity audiences at Deal’s Kilshawe Theatre last week. The cast, with notable exceptions was youthful, proving the rule by being incredibly young at heart. The Boy Friend is nothing more than a pastiche of the 1920s. But it has so much charm, so much simplicitythat it has been winning audiences all over the world for nearly 40 years. Sue Watson was delightful as Polly Browne, her portrayal being full of an ethereal wistfulness. Chris Tester was extremely personable as the lord’s son posing as a delivery boy. That’s the sort of thing the young did in those halcyon days when everybody, with the money, of course, rushed to the South of France. Here was a likeable, uninhibited couple that found true love virtually without an obstacle in the way. And that, of course, is the enchantment of the show. Complications are of only a minor nature and there are no villains. Debbie Johnson, Justine Sewell, Emily Straight and Leigh Robe were Polly’s finishing school chums and they were terrific fun, giving the production a bounce of a colourful beach ball. The quartet could sing and dance with verve and ability. The boys were Ben Munroe, Dannie Yates, Barrie Lewis‑Oswald and Andrew Slade; all very personable. Stephanie Walmsley, called in at the last minute, played Hortense, giving a competent performance, while Gill Watson made her Mme. Dubonnet a most likeable lady. Gerry Cavell, a consummate actor, was light‑hearted as Polly’s millionaire father, and Barrie Reynolds and Phyllis Gray bringing in the hint of farce as Lord and Lady Brockhurst. The cast was completed by Nathan Sewell, Marie Lee, Laura Thomsett, Melanie Thorne and Jonathan Slade. Full marks for Colin Hartley at the piano, who provided perfect accompaniment, and to Debbie Johnson for her imaginative choreography, which certainly helped capture the spirit of the age. Costumes were the work of Barrie Lewis‑Oswald and eye-catching they were, while Emily Straight designed perfect sets. Christopher Sewell directed and evoked all the frantic enthusiasm of the rich youngsters of those days. The Boy Friend was perfect entertainment and deserved the unstinted acclaim audiences gave it. When The Guild Players look for their 1983 musical show, how about Julian Slade’s Salad Days, another nostalgic show? These British musicals have a special magic that the American shows just cannot reach.

Tony Arnold

Production Team

Production Team

Director Christopher Sewell
Producer Prue Jamieson
Pianist Colin Hartley
Stage Managers Prue Jamieson, Jonathan Slade, Stephanie Young, Larry Smith, Nathan Sewell, Christine Eyden & Barry Sullivan
Set Design Emily Straight
Set Building/Décor Larry Smith, Freddy Roberts, Jonathan Slade, Emily Straight & Debbie Johnson
Costumes & Hair Design Barry Lewis-Oswald
Costume Production Barry Lewis-Oswald, Sue Wilkinson & Sheree Smith
Choreography Debbie Johnson
Lighting Nick Tigwell
Props Christine Eyden, Stephanie Young & Mary Jaconelli
Make-Up Barry Lewis-Oswald
Prompt Dot Smith
Front of House David Ashton, Brenda Smith & Pam Rawcliffe
Bar Ken Watson & Giff Goldfinch
Refreshments Sue Wilkinson & Sharee Smith
Guild Players Stall Annette Green
Publicity Stephanie Young
Window Displays Barry Lewis-Oswald & Debbie Johnson
Box Office Gwen Shane

Cast of The BoyfriendCast of The Boyfriend