Production 171 Frankenstein the Panto

Frankenstein the PantoBy David Swan

Performed on Wed 8th to Sat 11th December 2004 at The Kilshawe Theatre

 

 

The Cast

The Cast

Herr Pumpernickel Fred Sawyer
Frau Pumpernickel Mary Kettyle
Frankie Ben Griffiths
Heidi Yvette Chen
Kodak Charles Bain-Smith
Buckles Sabrina Smith
Prince Ludwig Debbie Pinfold
Professor Crackpot Duncan Currie
Miss Nelly David Carter
Bridget Bloggs Caroline Venner
Mabel Crumb Chloe Keenan
Agnes Swipe Tracie Pitcairn
Constance Swot Sophie Boddy
Ethel Ready Angela Jeffery
Count Dracula Lee Ralph
Granula Faye Rye

Cast of Frankenstein the PantoCast of Frankenstein the Panto

 

View the Gallery

View the Gallery

 

Previews/Reviews

Previews/Reviews

Frankenstein the Panto

Ben Griffiths as Frankie & David Carter as Miss Nelly

The Society is to be congratulated on choosing a pantomime which is not in the usual repertoire. It is always refreshing to see something different. However, the plot was very complicated and a little difficult to follow. I attended on the first night and the pace at first was slow. By the second act, it had improved, so the action held the attention of the audience. With a large cast, it is impossible to comment on everyone individually, but there were some good portrayals, which deserve special mention. Duncan Currie was very realistic as Professor Crackpot, a crazy inventor. He was extremely amusing and convincing as a look‑alike Benny Hill. David Carter, as Miss. Nellie, a headmistress, was ideal as the pantomime dame without overdoing the farcical element. He displayed many nuances in speech and facial expressions, which contributed to a consummate performance. His striptease was hilarious! Ben Griffiths gave a sympathetic performance as Frankie Stein. This was a role, which called for great versatility, and Ben rose successfully to the challenge. His likeable personality soon endeared him as everybody’s friend. Caroline Venner soon established herself as the leader of a group of rowdy schoolgirls under the supervision of Miss Nellie. Her acting and diction together with her attractive appearance were good and proclaimed her to be a very talented young lady. Lee Ralph as Count Dracula, a vampire, and Faye Rye as Granula, his Grandmother, suitably portrayed the forces of Evil but without recourse to the programme, one would have assumed them to be man and wife. A much greater age difference should have been made apparent. Granula required a much older make-up. Animals portrayed by humans are always popular and Kodak, played by Charles Bain Smith was no exception. His movements were really canine and he was immediately popular with the audience, especially with the juvenile members. Other roles were played by Fred Sawyer, (Herr Pumpernickel, an innkeeper) Mary Kettyle (Frau Pumpernickel, his wife), Yvette Chen (Heidi, an orphan), Sabrina Smith (Buckles, the prince’s valet), Debbie Pinfold (Prince Ludwig of Bavaria) as well as a group of schoolgirls and a chorus. There were three dancers who made brief appearances. Unfortunately, one of them chewed gum throughout her dances and this greatly detracted from the whole performance. I cannot think this was direction; rather lack of discipline. The production team had worked hard and greatly contributed to the success of the show. The set, lighting and sound were good. The pianist and percussionist provided the lively music throughout the evening. Costumes were highly effective with the one reservation for Granula. This was an imaginative production.

Sylvia Blogg
NODA Regional Representative

Production Team

Production Team

Directors Gail Pointon & Wayne Pointon
Producer Duncan Currie
Choreography Ann Nettleship
Musical Director Richard McPherson
Drums Alex Wilder/John Fisher

Faye Rye as Granula & Yvette Chen as HeidiBen Griffiths as Frankie & Duncan Currie as Professor Crackpot