Production 21 Watch it Sailor!

Watch it Sailor!By Philip King & Falkland L. Cary

Performed on Thu 9th to Sat 11th and Thu 16th to Sat 18th August 1962 at The Astor Theatre

 

 

The Cast

The Cast

Shirley Hornett Brenda Harvey
Albert Tufnell, A.B Norman Smith
Daphne Pink Pamela Rye
Carnoustie Bligh, A.B. Henry Riley
Henry Hornett Conrad Sherwin
Edie Hornett Dorrie Sherwin
Emma Hornett Doris Cohen
Mrs. Lack Molly Fitzgerald
Lieutenant Commander Hardcastle, R.N Andrew Lawson

Cast of Watch it Sailor!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Previews/Reviews

Previews/Reviews

Watch it Sailor

Cast of Watch it Sailor!

You Must Go and Watch It
Third Play in Deal’s Drama Festival

The great thing about Deal’s Eight-Week Drama Festival is that the same play is presented for two weeks in succession, giving those who have seen it a chance to recommend it to their friends – and there should be a great deal of recommending going on this week after the latest production, St. George’s Church Drama Guild’s Watch It Sailor. This new play – released for amateur presentation only last March – is by Philip King and Falkland L. Cary, and carried on in the same tradition and with the same characters as their enormously successful Sailor Beware, which was staged by the Drama Guild some time back. Then, we left the Hornett family wondering why Able Seaman Albet Tufnell had failed to turn up for his wedding to daughter Shirley. Watch it Sailor continues from that moment, and starts with the arrival back in the Hornett’s cosy nest of the erring bridegroom. His bride, played by Brenda Harvey, who took the part in the other production, is still sorrowful at having been left waiting at the alter, but is beginning to buck up as the wedding, delayed two hours, is rearranged. Albert, A.B., is very apologetic for what he has done, but is bracing himself like a man to face the music and enter into the happy state of marriage. Both were well-cast in their parts, which helped to make things run smoothly. Brenda did a good job in being able to turn on the tears at the right time, and looked charming in her wedding dress. The only critical comment about Norman Smith, who played Albert, was that at times his lines were delivered with a certain lack of conviction, as if he had learned them perfectly, but was not too sure exactly what he was saying. This was noticeable, especially near the beginning of the play, but later on he settled down and got into the swing of things. Apart from these infrequent lapses, he was very good. Edie Hornett, (Dorrie Sherwin) was an example of one of those characters who, though with nothing solid to contribute to the plot, managed to steal the show. Her portrayal of the timid sister with her Great Sorrow and passion for making cups of tea, was superb. Equally good was producer-actor Conrad Sherwin, who played Henry Hornett, a quiet inoffensive husband, who would have been quite content with life if people would leave him and his ferrets in peace. His domineering wife, Emma (Doris Cohen) , made Henry coer into his armchair at her every appearance, and he contrived to really look scared of her. The sudden change from a mouse to the efficient producer he obviously must have been disconcerting at times for producer Sherwin, but he operated perfectly in both capabilities. Albert’s best man, Able Seaman Carnoustie Bligh, was as convincingly played as ever by Henry Riley, and his actions as the droll Scot forever resisting the amorous approaches of bridesmaid Daphne Pink (Pamela Rye) kept the audience continually amused. Molly Fitzgerald, as the interfering neighbour, Mrs. Lack , kept up the tradition of fine performances we have seen from her in past presentations. And newcomer Andrew Lawson, as Lieut.‑Cmdr. Hardcastle, R.N., showed promise that I hope will get him a bigger part in future plays. The living room scenery was pleasing, and stage managers Clare Bradshaw and Peggy Thompson made things neat and tidy, no doubt as a woman like Emma would keep them. Quite natural make-up by Joyce Jewson made sure that there were no ghastly white faces on stage and prompt Sheila Spencer had quite an easy time. Although his chattering neighbours sounded like a flock of startled geese and the taxi horn like the South Goodwin lightship in a Channel fog, David Johnson’s sound effects were always right on time, which is more than many companies can boast. Those who took part were: Brenda Harvey, Norman Smith, Pamela Rye, Henry Riley, Conrad Sherwin, Dorrie Sherwin, Doris Cohen, Molly Fitzgerald and Andrew Lawson.

M.B.B.

Production Team

Production Team

Producer & Director Conrad Sherwin
Décor Guild Players Members
Stage Managers Clare Bradshaw & Peggy Thomson
Make-Up Joyce Jewson
Sound Effects David Johnson
Prompt Sheila Spencer
Front of House Deal Corporation, assisted by Bert Bradshaw, Freda Hogben, Vera Eckersley, Mary Rose, Elsie Lawson, Dawn Ladd & Katherine Johnson

Cast of Watch it Sailor!