Production 44 Wild Horses

Wild HorsesBy Ben Travers

Performed on Thu 6th to Sat 8th and Thu 13th to Sat 15th July 1967 at The Astor Theatre
Part of Deal Corporation’s Summer Playhouse

 

 

The Cast

The Cast

Kate Slaughter Thelma Faulkner
George Slaughter Julian Grenville
Cora Carol Smith
David Peter Eckersley
Iris Ingle Doris Cohen
Mrs. Beebee Claire Bradshaw
Trumper Norton Tony Kilshawe
Sir. William Reckam Conrad Sherwin
Police Seargent Colin Whitmore
Constable Osbourn Robin Davies
Constable Conrad Sherwin
Other Parts Alex Thomson & John Evans

Cast of Wild Horses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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View the Gallery

 

Previews/Reviews

Previews/Reviews

Cast of Wild Horses

Wild Horses is a Romp

A The Guild Players backed a wild horse with their farcical comedy at the Astor Theatre last week and it only just crossed the finishing line of success. The play Wild Horses, by Ben Travers, took some time to get really warmed up – but this was not the fault of the Players, I found that I did not really begin to enjoy it until the end of the second act, when things began to speed up. There were just one or two moments when things were not going smoothly, but the faltering in lines was very well covered. This was probably due to first night nerves, and the production which will be staged tonight (Thursday) until Saturday should be very well polished and well worth attending. Wild Horses was well produced by Tony Kilshawe. Thelma Faulkner plays Kate Slaughter, second wife to George, played by Julian Grenville. George is the domesticated sort of husband who dose not mind his stint of washing up – probably so he can break relics of crockery kept by his wife. He has served a prison sentence which is kept as one big secret. Into the scene fits Cora, played by Carol Smith, the step-daughter, whose main worry is raising £250 to secure a deal on a house. She is due to be married to David, played by Peter Eckersley, a flustered type of person who worries a lot. Then enters Iris Ingle, played by Doris Cohen, a visitor who spots a painting that Cora has found while going through an attic. Father George tells Cora to remove the terrible painting. The painting becomes the whole key to the dilemma, aptly painted by Herring, it becomes a red‑herring more than once. And so the farce develops. The painting was given to George by his first mother-in-law, Mrs Beebee, who goes to a garden party and is told that her painting might be worth at least £2000 or so! Mrs. Ingle spots the painting as being rare. She is told it belongs to David and Cora, while George is trying to get rid of old things accumulated over two marriages. David gets £250, the sum he needs. And the painting belongs to Iris! Matters are complicated by Trumper Norton, played by Tony Kilshawe, his wit really shines through and added the finishing touches to a great laugh. He is a friend of Iris. The painting of two wild horses is then bought off George for £4 by Trumper, who sells it for £1,500 to pay a fine for smuggling. He recognises George as an old prisoner buddy. First mother-in-law, Mrs. Beebee, arrives on the scene, demanding her painting back. This sets things going! George is too bothered for words, all he wants to do is curl up in front of his fire with the daily paper. He does not know whether he is coming or going, but he does find himself dressing up as Mrs. Beebee’s housekeeper, in front of the police, which makes a good giggle. Mrs. Beebee sends for the garden party companion, Sir William Reckham (Conrad Sherwin) to see the painting. He is told to wait at the house and someone from Mrs. Beebee will collect the picture. The big chance to get the picture! George is conned into working in alliance with Trumper. George dresses up as a woman and arrives at the house as Mrs. Beebee’s housekeeper! He gets the painting alright, but as he is leaving. George’s wife sees this woman – screams and soon the police enter the scene! Watching the police try and sort out who is who and what is what is quite something! The police seargent is played by Colin Whitmore, a towering officious copper who does not like any nonsense, and he receives little help from a backward constable, P.C. Osbourn, played by Robin Davis. An over-keen constable is played by Conrad Sherwin, the only actor with two parts to handle. The police give up trying to sort out a muddle, although it is well sorted out for the audience. The play took some time to set the story before the actual farce got under way, but perhaps this is the essence of good farce.

P.Y.

Production Team

Production Team

Director Tony Kilshawe

Cast of Wild Horses