Production 69 The Man Most Likely To

The Man Most Likely ToBy Joyce Rayburn

 

Performed on Thu 16th to Sat 18th March 1972 at The Astor Theatre
In aid of Cancer Research

 

The Cast

The Cast

Victor Cadwallader Tony Kilshawe
John Cadwallader Doris Cohen
Martin Morley Alex Thomson
Shirley Hughes Gill Watson
Giles Cadwallader Martin Brody

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Previews/Reviews

Previews/Reviews

The Man Most Likely To

Why the Menace of That Blue Pencil?

The Man Most Likely To.. is a recent West End success and was a happy choice for The Guild Players at The Astor Theatre, Deal, last week. This comedy by Joyce Rayburn, has a scintillating script and takes a warm-hearted tilt at permissiveness. I was a little surprised, therefore, to find, here and there, some of the more brittle lines had disappeared. That theatrical menace, the blue pencil, had been at work. But this, thank goodness, did nothing to mar the enjoyment of the show, one of the most mirth-provoking seen in Deal for some time. The deft direction of Tony Kilshawe, who is always at his best with these sophisticated plays, set the seal of success. It was as light as the best of mother’s pastry and it brought out the level best of a talented cast. Every situation was exploited to the full and there wasn’t a single laugh thrown away. Tony himself played a successful industrialist with an eye for women, but why on earth he had to wear an old fashioned nightgown I can’t imagine. The Victorians may have had a word for it and, indeed, recent books suggest we have undervalued their sexual expertise. But a nightgown is not a thing to tempt a dolly bird. Tony Kilshawe presented a well drawn man that was wholly credible and the final let down left him with the sympathy of the audience. Doris Cohen played his wife and gave a down to earth study of a lady conducting her own fatuous love triangle and I found her performance most satisfying. Alex Thomson presented a beautifully drawn cameo of the quite harmless other man who loved to spend his time in the kitchen. He invested the characters with just the right amount of eccentricity. It was a little gem and crammed full of hilarity. Attractive Gill Watson set the pace throughout the production with her portrayal of the promiscuous girlfriend of the son who makes a play for the father. Whatever her morals, one couldn’t help liking the girl, who revealed a real warm-hearted nature, and wishing one could get nearer to her. Gill revealed a happy knack of getting her laugh lines at just the right pitch and her timing was perfect. Martin Brody was forceful as the son out to shock his parents and his contribution to the play, something of a sobering influence, was, in its way, a social message. The Guild Players will present The Heiress the Ruth and Augustus Goetz adaptation of the Henry James novel Washington Square at The Astor in May.

Tony Arnold
Published in the East Kent Mercury March 23rd 1972

Production Team

Production Team

Director Tony Kilshawe
Front of House Reuben Atkinson
Stage Director Edward Stanley
Stage Managers Molly Fitzgerald & Robert Johnston
Lighting & Effects Arthur Laffar
Wardrobe & Make-Up Joyce Jewson
Scenery Guild Players Members
Décor Charles Jennings